7 of the Most Influential Women in Digital Media Advertising

This month we celebrate Women’s History Month. Since the beginning of advertising, women have made a significant impact, whether they were recognized for their successes or not. As a female in the advertising, I look up to those women like Mary Wells Lawrence who paved the way for women in the industry. To this day, the world of advertising remains a male-dominated field. In fact, only 3% of creative leadership positions are held by women, while ironically women control 80% of consumer spending in America.

With that being said, in honor of Women’s History Month I would like to celebrate women today who are making a difference in the field of digital media advertising. You may have never heard their names, but their work more than likely impacts your day-to-day activities.

Sheryl Sandberg: Chief Operating Officer at Facebook

Woman's History Month - Sheryl Sandberg.When first joining Facebook in 2008, Sandberg’s first goal was to make it profitable. This lead to the creation of Facebook’s first advertising platform of “ads discreetly presented” and by 2010 the company become profitable. Today Sandberg oversees all of Facebook’s operations including sales, marketing, business development, human resources, public policy and communications. As a reward for her great efforts, she was invited to the board of directors. The first women on Facebook’s board.

Kim Luegers Morse: Product Consultant at LinkedIn

Woman's History Month - Kim Luegers MorseBefore landing her current position as Product Consultant at LinkedIn, Kim was the Director of Mobile and Emerging Media at Pandora. There, she was partially responsible for the company’s $100 million-plus in mobile advertising sales revenue. Currently at LinkedIn, she works to help higher education institutions leverage LinkedIn media effectively to achieve their marketing objectives. The social network, which is primarily used by business professionals world-wide, has over 300 million active monthly users (and counting.)

Susan Wojcicki: CEO at YouTube

Woman's History Month - Susan Wojcicki.Susan become Google’s 16th employee and marketing executive in 1999. She was able to license their search technology and led initial development of Google’s image search. Later on, she advanced to Vice President of Advertising & Commerce and created the advertising and analytic products offered by Google including: AdWords, AdSense, DoubleClick and Google Analytics.

Arianna Huffington: Co-Founder/Editor-In-Chief at Huffington Post

Woman's History Month - Arianna Huffington
Arianna boldly took on the world of digital media in 2005 with Huffington Post, an American online news aggregator and blog. Today, her creation has flooded our Facebook newsfeeds and Twitter timelines to become a household name with viral post after viral post. It’s likely worth an estimated $100 million.



Sara Clemens: Chief Strategy Officer at Pandora

Woman's History Month - Sara Clemens


As Chief of Strategy at Pandora, Sara works towards global expansion along with perfecting the internet radio company’s business strategy. Prior to landing her Pandora gig, Sara held leadership positons at Greylock Partners, LinkedIn and Microsoft.



Lisa Utzschneider: Senior VP, Sales, Americas at Yahoo

Woman's History Month.Lisa certainly has an impressive resume, which presumably helped her land the job as Senior Vice President at Yahoo in February of 2014. She started out as a General Sales Manager at Microsoft where for ten years she led several advertising initiatives for product development and sales. Lisa then joined Amazon in 2008 as their President of Global Advertising. As President of Global Advertising, she assumed the role of operating all of the company’s owned websites including Amazon, IMDb and DPReview. She developed long lasting sales strategies and advertising solutions for the ecommerce conglomerate.

Carolyn Everson: VP, Global Marketing Solutions at Facebook

Woman's History Month - Carolyn EversonWith previous experience from Walt Disney Imaginnering, MTV Networks and Microsoft, Carolyn brings innovation and leadership to Facebook. Her efforts have cultivated Facebook into the leader of mobile advertising. She’s responsible for growing Facebook’s ad revenue, which recently accounted for 62% of the $2.7 billion the social network made last year-not to mention mobile ad revenue alone was up 151% from the year before.



Who are the women that inspire you?

The women above represent some of the most successful digital brands in the world. Not only have they helped lay the foundation for digital media success, they continue to build up to make the internet more enjoyable and entertaining. We’d love to hear about more women who are making an impact in digital media advertising! Please leave a comment below to continue the conversation.

Is it worthwhile to advertise on Pandora or Spotify?

Pandora, Spotify and other music services are the wave of the future for music listening. MP3 purchases and CDs are way down in sales, as the public at large moves toward services that will stream their favorite music for a low monthly fee. It doesn’t matter for many that you don’t own the tracks, if you can access a radio station that plays them frequently (in Pandora’s case), or has access to any songs at any time (in Spotify’s case).

As of this article’s publication, Pandora boasts 76.5 million users and Spotify 60 million users. The massive popularity of both music services, and the fact that the large majority of users opt for the free, ad-driven version of the service, means that advertising there can make a lot of sense. Let’s look at what’s involved in an audio ad and whether it’s worthwhile to advertise this way.

  1. Professional Recording
    Unlike a text or graphical ad, the ads on Pandora and Spotify are audio. In some cases, there’s a graphical popup element for the phone app, so there may yet be some text / graphic design element to the ad. For the most part, it’s audio. This is something you’re not going to want to have someone in the office record on their iPhone.A good audio ad is professionally recorded in a sound studio by a trained voice actor, is attention-grabbing and witty, doesn’t apologize for interrupting the music, and gets to the point early in the time alloted.
  2. The Ad Script
    You’re going to want to write a dialogue script and read it aloud to make sure it sounds natural. Like with any other ad, be sure there’s a call to action, such as a coupon code or an easy-to-remember URL. Again, if there’s a graphical pop-up ad in the music app’s user interface that the user can click on, be sure to integrate these well in the planning and scripting process.
  3. Ad Rates
    Both Spotify and Pandora have ad rates that are not public until you get in touch with them, likely because they fluctuate often due to the surging popularity of streaming music services. However, both ad departments are easy to get in touch with with ad rates, specifications, ad standards, minimum buys and so on. It’s going to be somewhat pricey — especially compared to a typical social media ad on another platform.
  4. Not Just Audio
    Pandora has dozens of different ad configurations that stretch beyond audio ads, to animated overlays to banners to custom mixtapes. Agencies that really like to think outside the box will find a lot to play with here.Spotify also has just introduced video ads to go along with their traditional audio ads, and these join their many other ad formats, such as watching a video to get 30 minutes of ad-free listening, display ads and even homepage takeover ads.
  5. Should I?
    Advertising on a music service is a way to reach a connected, music-loving audience in a hyper-focused way that might not be possible on another platform. That bears repeating: Listeners on Spotify and Pandora are music fans first, so if your product makes sense to that kind of person, then give it a try.

To explore out-of-the-box thinking with advertising your product or service, contact StrataBlue today.